a Review on Sonnet 73

when the strength of youth is past." "d in Rollins,. When the roof of the one is shattered, and the boughs of the other leafless, the comparison becomes more solemn and picturesque" "d in Smith,. Is the poet saying that the young man now understands that he will lose his own youth and passion, after listening to the lamentations in the three preceding quatrains? So yes, we should live free and love hard and all that cheesy, roll-your-eyes jazz. Ah, but that's just. But the first quatrain is the boldest, and the effect of the whole is slightly anti-climactic. The poet is preparing his young friend, not for the approaching literal death of his body, but the metaphorical death of his youth and passion. It is overcast by the shadow of death and belongs to a date perhaps not far from 1609.

This is further emphasised by the use of the phrase 'seals up' with its connotations of the coffin. The choirs formerly rang with the sounds of 'sweet birds'. We have first a year, and the final season of it; then only a day, and the stretch of it; then just a fire, built for part of the day, and the final minutes of it; then - entirely deprived of life, in prospect, and. The images presented are those of winter.

The poem could also be compared to Sonnet 55 where monuments are besmeared by sluttish time. Shakespeares Sonnet 73 is the third of four poems concerned with aging (Sonnets 71-74). It is one thing to have the boughs shaking against the cold, and in that capacity they carry very well the fact of the old rejected lover; it is another thing to represent them as ruined choirs where the birds no longer sing. As after sunset fadeth in the west, After the sun sets in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Which is soon extinguished by black night, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. Bare ruin'd choirs (4 a reference to the remains of a church or, more specifically, a chancel, stripped of its roof and exposed to the elements. The famous poet William Wordsworth wrote that "the appropriate business of Poetry, (which, nevertheless, if genuine, is as permanent as pure science her privilege and duty, is to treat of things not as they are, but as they appear ; not as they exist. The word 'mayst' in the opening line of the poem is an invitation for his companion to look at him. Like, every single human being who has ever lived has had to deal with exactly those same issues; what could you possibly hope to add to the conversation? For more on how the sonnets are grouped, please see the general introduction to Shakespeare's sonnets. The first quatrain introduces a metaphor of the year to stand for his life. And then he even throws in that couplet at the end, which sums up everything that has come before.

A Review on Sonnet 73
a Review on Sonnet 73