the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions

and all their validity, and all their authority mediately and. He has endeavored, in every way that he could to destroy her confidence in her own powers, to lessen her self-respect, and to make her willing to lead a dependent and abject life. Resolved, That woman is mans equal was intended to be so by the Creator, and the highest good of the race demands that she should be recognized as such. Lucretia Coffin Mott, and, martha Coffin Wright. She invited Frederick Douglass to attend. Retrieved June 20, 2018. Now, in view of this entire disfranchisement of one-half the people of this country, their social and religious degradation in view of the unjust laws above mentioned, and because women do feel themselves aggrieved, oppressed and fraudulently deprived of their most sacred rights, we insist that. 8 Margaret Jenkins Cynthia Fuller Mary Martin.A.

The Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions
the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions

Resolved, that the objection of indelicacy and impropriety, which is so often brought against woman when she addresses a public audience, comes with a very ill grace from those who encourage, by their attendance, her appearance on the stage, in the concert, or in feats. M'Clintock - daughter of Mary Ann M'Clintock. Resolved, That the same amount of virtue, delicacy, and refinement of behavior that is required of woman in the social state, should also be required of man, and the same transgressions should be visited with equal severity on both man and woman. Introduction Women were not allowed to do many things during those times. He allows her in Church, as well as State, but a subordinate position, claiming Apostolic authority for her exclusion from the ministry, and, with some exceptions, from any public participation in the affairs of the Church. Modern History Source book: Seneca Falls: The Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 "Signers of the Declaration of Sentiments". He allows her in church, as well as state, but a subordinate position, claiming apostolic authority for her exclusion from the ministry, and, with some exceptions, from any public participation in the affairs of the church. Therefore, I must say, I admire Stanton for her courage to stand up for her rights in a time where we were seen as merely child-bearers. He has compelled her to submit to laws, in the formation of which she had no voice.